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brokeandbespoke:

Hucklebury Pop-Up Shop at San Francisco’s Westfield Shopping Center

Kiyoshi posted the other day about Hucklebury’s Pop-Up event going on through tomorrow at San Francisco’s Westfield Shopping Center, and since I live in the neighborhood I thought I’d swing by and check it out today. I got a chance to chat with Parag (who co-founded Hucklebury with friend Dhawal) and we had a nice chat in the store and over coffee. He’s a great guy, and I think there’ll be some exciting things in store for Hucklebury in 2013.

I had a chance to try on some of their shirtings, and I can say they’re quite nice. The fabrics all come from Tessitura Monti, one of Italy’s finest cotton mills, and they’re produced in Jordan in a factory that also produces shirts for Zegna and Armani. The workers are experienced, and the quality control—from what I could tell by looking at the shirts—is top-notch.

Hucklebury shirts come in two cuts, Classic and Slim. The Slim is indeed quite slim (much slimmer than Brooks Brothers Slim Fit), so much so that a week of eating Bojangles’ and other excessively fattening Southern delights made it a bit too snug on me. A couple of guys who tried them on while I was hanging around in the shop looked great in them though.The Classic Fit is still quite flattering however, and is what I would have gone with if I’d purchased a shirt. It was not at all blousey like I was afraid it might be. In fact, I’d say the Classic Fit shirt I tried on was similar in cut to a normal OTR slim fit shirt from the likes of Brooks Brothers, Polo, etc.

What stood out to me most about the Hucklebury shirts though was their collars. The button-down has an amazing roll to it, and the spread has a nice 3” length to it and is, like the button-down, of a soft construction. Following a Savile Row tradition (the idea for Hucklebury was, in fact, born out of a conversation with a tailor on the Row), Hucklebury’s shirt collars are fused from the outside in, making for collars that stand robustly throughout a long day of wear without having to have a stiff and uncomfortable interlining.

If you live in the Bay Area and are in the market for some new shirts, definitely try to swing by the Hucklebury Pop-Up before it closes tomorrow. If not, I still recommend checking out the company’s website. Though not inexpensive, I think if you’re looking for a nice slim fitting shirt that is designed and crafted with fine attention to detail and uses some of the finest cotton shirting fabric in the world, Hucklebury offers a solid value.

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storefrontis:

Even if you live under a social media “rock” you are sure to have heard about one of this years biggest events, NY Fashion Week 2012. The big apple hosts one of the biggest fashion events in the world to hundreds of thousands of viewers and millions of followers throughout the world.  Since many people don’t understand the true ripple effect that NY Fashion Week has on not just the fashion industry, but many industries it is helpful to follow a fashion trend from runway to closet. 
In 2008, the NY Times featured an article on how colors used in Michael Kors runway style trickled down into clothing found on the racks at Forever 21 the following season. All eyes are on the NY Fashion Week not to necessarily purchase a $4,000 Chanel dress, but to see shapes, styles, colors, hair, makeup and even runway design trends.  Also, many eyes are not even on the NY Fashion Week itself, but the events surrounding.
Skirting NY Fashion Week, Artists & Fleas have opened up a one-week popup shop to offer items from over 30 local vendors (see photo).  Attendees can peruse items and possibly purchase some for their retail stores, or just themselves. The popup shop is a trend within itself, popping up from the UK to San Francisco. This new trend is here to stay, offering consumers a unique retail experience similar to the New York Fashion Week. 

storefrontis:

Even if you live under a social media “rock” you are sure to have heard about one of this years biggest events, NY Fashion Week 2012. The big apple hosts one of the biggest fashion events in the world to hundreds of thousands of viewers and millions of followers throughout the world.  Since many people don’t understand the true ripple effect that NY Fashion Week has on not just the fashion industry, but many industries it is helpful to follow a fashion trend from runway to closet. 

In 2008, the NY Times featured an article on how colors used in Michael Kors runway style trickled down into clothing found on the racks at Forever 21 the following season. All eyes are on the NY Fashion Week not to necessarily purchase a $4,000 Chanel dress, but to see shapes, styles, colors, hair, makeup and even runway design trends.  Also, many eyes are not even on the NY Fashion Week itself, but the events surrounding.

Skirting NY Fashion Week, Artists & Fleas have opened up a one-week popup shop to offer items from over 30 local vendors (see photo).  Attendees can peruse items and possibly purchase some for their retail stores, or just themselves. The popup shop is a trend within itself, popping up from the UK to San Francisco. This new trend is here to stay, offering consumers a unique retail experience similar to the New York Fashion Week. 

(via storefrontis)

Link Storefront.is: Top 10 Reasons to Start a Pop-up Shop

storefrontis:

First, what is a pop-up shop? Is it the person at the mall at a tiny kiosk spraying you with awful smelling perfume? No, it is not! A pop-up shop can be defined as any short-term retail space either selling a product or promoting a brand. Pop-up shops are quick, eye-catching and fun.

1. Cross-channel selling works

(via storefrontis)

Link Naveed Lalani: Purpose-Driven User Experience

naveedl:

This article originally appeared on the GSD&M Blog.

Jonathan Ive

“I think so many of the objects we’re surrounded by seem trivial. And I think that’s because they’re either trying to make a statement or trying to be overtly different. What we were trying to do was have a very honest approach…

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Tackle Big Dreams, There’s No Competition


In line with Paul Graham’s “Frighteningly Ambitious Startup Ideas" essay. Go big. Then go bigger.  


Larry Page: Tackle Big Dreams, There’s No Competition

I think it is often easier to make progress on mega-ambitious dreams. I know that sounds completely nuts. But, since no one else is crazy enough to do it, you have little competition. There are so few people this crazy that I feel like I know them all by first name. They all travel as if they are pack dogs and stick to each other like glue. The best people want to work the big challenges. That is what happened with Google. ~University of Michigan, 2009


Full article

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The Pop up Trend

lovepopup:

Online stores are proving to be exciting new adopters of the pop-up idea by creating limited edition products or collections. Similarly, unique partnerships are becoming a fascinating component of flash retail both online and in brick and mortar operations. Themed shops featuring independent makers, charity tie-ins and bloggers/tastemakers becoming retail curators – the new niches are thrilling. Read the full article

Link Jason Shah: Airbnb UX Wins and Losses | How The Airbnb Home Page Lures Us In

jasonshah:

There must be something to learn from the Airbnb user experience.

Airbnb, like many startups following in its path of collaborative consumption or others simply trying to power offline action, have the challenge of earning user trust. While PR, word of mouth, and direct outreach can alleviate…